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2020 Outlook for U.S. Equities & Economy

December 12, 2019

Key Takeaways
  • While the manufacturing contraction could marginally worsen due to trade tensions and slower capex, the consumer side of the economy should remain strong enough to avert recession.
  • The likelihood of continued volatility in 2020 steers us to high-quality growth companies with strong moats around their businesses and more defensive sectors that have tended to hold up well during turbulent periods.
  • Several indicators related to the presidential election cycle and periods following a yield curve inversion suggest the bull market will continue into next year.
Consumer Strength Should Avert Recession as Equity Markets Remain Volatile

The S&P 500 Index made new all-time highs in 2019, as on-and-off trade tensions with China eased, the Federal Reserve cut interest rates three times and corporate earnings held up better than anticipated. Strong market performance came against a backdrop of weakening economic activity, reflected in the overall signal for the ClearBridge Recession Risk Dashboard turning yellow in June, indicating caution. As we enter 2020, both the U.S. and global economies are clearly slowing; the key question is whether we are on the cusp of a recession or a late-cycle slowdown. The economy typically sees an inflection point six to nine months after the dashboard turns yellow, so we should have confirmation by early next year of the severity of the current soft patch.

Our base case is for a slowdown within an ongoing economic expansion. While we expect the contraction of the manufacturing sector to marginally worsen as the ongoing trade war hurts business confidence and slows capex, the consumer side of the economy should remain strong enough to avert recession. The labor market and wage growth are healthy - although wage pressure is mounting among lower paid employees - which should underpin consumer spending, while the Fed has joined with central banks around the world in ramping up monetary accommodation.

This consumer strength is reflected by all four consumer indicators in the dashboard flashing green, indicating expansion. After slowing in line with rising mortgage rates, housing permit growth has resumed since the Fed shifted its monetary policy stance and mortgage rates eased. Strong job numbers in October and November are consistent with jobless claims continuing to trend around 50-year lows while job sentiment has improved after a mid-year decline, with job openings outnumbering unemployed workers by a significant margin (Exhibit 1). The wildcard among our consumer indicators is retail sales, which posted a surprise decline in September before rebounding in October. Monthly sales numbers can be noisy, but a drop in spending – which accounts for 70% of the U.S. economy – would be a major concern.

 

Exhibit 1: Job Openings vs. Unemployed

Data as of Aug. 31, 2019, latest available as of Sept. 30, 2019. Source: FactSet, DOL, NBER.

 

Cyclicals have gotten a bid from the Fed easing, but this rally could be short-lived as we do not believe the manufacturing side of the economy is out of the woods yet. For example, corporate credit spreads at the lowest quality ratings, which encompass energy, industrials and some retail names, are at their widest levels in over a year. Instead, the likelihood of continued volatility in 2020 steers us to high-quality growth companies with strong moats around their businesses and more defensive areas of the market that have tended to hold up well during turbulent periods. Consumer staples and utilities should continue to lead unless we see a clear resolution of the trade war and improving global growth. One of the benefits of these stocks is dividends. Through the third quarter of 2019, 42% of S&P 500 stocks had a higher dividend yield than the 30-year U.S. Treasury bond.

 

Exhibit 2: Dividend Paying Equities Look Attractive

As of Sept. 30, 2019. Source: FactSet.

 

While volatility will likely remain elevated, a market drawdown next year is not imminent. In fact, over the last 19 U.S. presidential election cycles, stocks have suffered losses just twice in the 12 months leading up to election day, delivering an average return of 8%. Equities have also tended to do well in periods following a yield curve inversion, especially if no recession occurs, rising 13.5% on average in the subsequent 12 months. The 2-year/10-year U.S. Treasury yield curve inverted in August, suggesting that stocks could climb through most of next year.

Jeffrey Schulze, CFA

Investment Strategist
14 Years experience
5 Years at ClearBridge

Related Perspectives

  • Past performance is no guarantee of future results.

  • All opinions and data included in this commentary are as of the publication date and are subject to change. The opinions and views expressed herein are of the author and may differ from other portfolio managers or the firm as a whole, and are not intended to be a forecast of future events, a guarantee of future results or investment advice. This information should not be used as the sole basis to make any investment decision. The statistics have been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but the accuracy and completeness of this information cannot be guaranteed. Neither ClearBridge Investments, LLC  nor its information providers are responsible for any damages or losses arising from any use of this information. 

  • Performance source: Internal. Benchmark source: Standard & Poor’s.